Food you can cook

markers15

-chan
Kouhai
I can cook rice,mashed potatoes and im a MASTER at cooking up pasta from maccoroni to rigatoni whatever you call it I can cook it
wink.gif
.
 

warita200

Tai Youkai
Sempai
Hi there fellow FTV-lers...... I am so proud of myself, I made sushi last week and decided to share with you.

Actually, making sushi is surprisingly easy. The motivation was originally not only to try fixing sushi myself, but I also hoped to save some money, as buying sushi is so expensive here in Vienna. Well, if you want some decent sushi that is. The moment of final decision came the day before, when a friend of mine and I went shopping and stopped at a sushi place to have a refreshment. First we waited at least 25min for the sushi and then it was of quastionable quality considering it was freshly made. And I paid 13 euros for it. So I thought: ok, time to make my own, it cant possibly be so difficult. And guess what? It is totally easy!!!
The only thing that deterred me from making my own sushi until now was the price of the ingredients. We have only one japanese store in Vienna (as far as I know) and their prices are beyond good and bad. But I was lucky and the store had a 30% sale, so I shopped my soul out and bought all the necessary ingredients such as japanese rice, rice vinegar, wasabi and nori sheets, the soja sauce I alread had at home. I also purchased fresh salmon fish and off I went home to fix some sushi. And it was so easy to make. I mean seriously, you just cook rice, mix some rice vinegar into it when it is done, form small rice bodies out of it, smear some wasabi on the top and and place a piece of fish on it. A kindergarden kid could manage that.

Even the maki rolls were surprisingly easy to make, I imagined it difficult, but it wasnt. I didnt even use the rolling mat, I didnt see any sense in that. I even tried the californian rolls, which are supposed to be hard to make, but it was a piece of cake..... who knows, maybe I am naturally talented. My makis were perfectly formed and I felt like a a mother that has given birth to her first child, I was so proud. Unfortunately, all that excitment made me forget to take a picture of my work of art, so I will add some pics next time I make sushi, which I hope wont be very long.

Anybody out there that has tried making sushi as well?
 

Ausdoerrt

-sama
Retired
Actually putting sushi together isn't very hard - with a bit of practice. I've tried to roll stuff before and it's pretty basic. However, as with most Japanese food, it's all about the little nuances in preparing the ingredients and mixing stuff in correct proportions. I personally don't know the "right" proportions for mixing the rice with vinegar, sugar and whatever else, so I've never bothered to experiment (besides I'm not a big sushi fan anyway). To my knowledge, Japanese food is all about thin flavors, so you can't paint with a thick stroke like I'm used to for cooking Eastern-European food. Then again, our poor gaijin tastes probably couldn't tell the difference anyway. It all tastes OK as long as ingredients are fresh, but how "authentic" it is as sushi is IMO debatable.

So as much as I like Asian food, it's foreign to me so I prefer to leave the cooking to the experts. Plus, 13 Euro for a sushi meal doesn't sound so bad to me. In my little college town sushi can cost $15+ for one roll - meaning an expected $25-30 for a meal, plus tip. As good as it is, I tend to avoid it like plague and instead get my fill at the nearby Chinese place with much lower prices and bigger portions
biggrin.gif
I just wish Americans weren't such wimps when it comes to spice. Getting a truly spicy dish in a Chinese-American restaurant is nigh impossible. I miss ordering a spicy dish and get a heap of food that's 50% red pepper and numb-spice.
 

ImTakes

sama
Retired
QUOTE (Ausdoerrt @ Mar 06 2011, 10:42 PM) So as much as I like Asian food, it's foreign to me so I prefer to leave the cooking to the experts. Plus, 13 Euro for a sushi meal doesn't sound so bad to me. In my little college town sushi can cost $15+ for one roll - meaning an expected $25-30 for a meal, plus tip. As good as it is, I tend to avoid it like plague and instead get my fill at the nearby Chinese place with much lower prices and bigger portions 
biggrin.gif
I just wish Americans weren't such wimps when it comes to spice. Getting a truly spicy dish in a Chinese-American restaurant is nigh impossible.
^ Ah...you need to sail on down to Southern California, my fine friend. Here you can eat your fill of Japanese and Chinese and Thai cuisine! As Southern California has a very high population of all three cultures, one is sure to find little pockets of places that cater to one's palate...Little Tokyo or the South Bay, known for some of the best Japanese food anywhere in the states, as well as Chinese and Thai. As far as spicy goes? Well, again, you will find all types of spicy here...
wink.gif

I will tell you that we do not worry about what is authentic, what is not, since there are so many authentic Japanese groceries stores, as well as Chinese and Thai. When friends come to visit, it is a sheer delight to go and take them out to such places...they are in awe of the abundance of choices when it comes to Asian foods and the like.
I have never tried making sushi since my interest lies in Mexican cuisine but if I ever do, I will have fun and maybe too, partake in one of the many "Sushi classes" that are offered at various restaurants, in the greater Los Angeles area.
wink.gif

The prices are not bad either...thanks to the many choices, prices are very competitive! We have lots of Japanese and Chinese bakeries as well, with goodies and the like...Mochi ice cream is the best! As is the Daifuku...yummy!
Anyway...bon appetit!
 

warita200

Tai Youkai
Sempai
QUOTE (Ausdoerrt @ Mar 07 2011, 12:42 AM) Actually putting sushi together isn't very hard - with a bit of practice. I've tried to roll stuff before and it's pretty basic. However, as with most Japanese food, it's all about the little nuances in preparing the ingredients and mixing stuff in correct proportions. I personally don't know the "right" proportions for mixing the rice with vinegar, sugar and whatever else, so I've never bothered to experiment (besides I'm not a big sushi fan anyway). To my knowledge, Japanese food is all about thin flavors, so you can't paint with a thick stroke like I'm used to for cooking Eastern-European food. Then again, our poor gaijin tastes probably couldn't tell the difference anyway. It all tastes OK as long as ingredients are fresh, but how "authentic" it is as sushi is IMO debatable.


Yeah, you might be right on that one. Actually, I thought about it myself, what would a japanese person say to my sushi. But then again, I didnt cook for any japanese, I cooked for myself and my friend and we both enjoyed it
biggrin.gif
and thats the most important thing. Also my friend said, that my sushi tasted WAY BETTER than the sushi we had the day before and I agree. For some reason my sushi tasted fresher than the one at the restaurant even though theirs was also made fresh. Hmmmm

PS: euro has a higher value than a dollar.... but still 25$ for a sushi plate is a rip off!!!
 

Ausdoerrt

-sama
Retired
@ImTakes: I am yet to make it down to the SW. Unfortunately, I probably won't in the near future, since I'll be stuck looking for a job in DC area after graduation, unless magic happens and UCLA accepts me for graduate admission and gives me lots of money. A visit to California is definitely on my list of things to do once I'm well-settled though. It had better be as good as everyone says - I'm picky about my Asian food, having spent half a year in Beijing and all
dry.gif
But, I'd be elatedif I could play around with something like this again:

laziji.jpg
 

ImTakes

sama
Retired
UCLA??!! Now, that would be something since Westwood and the Santa Monica area are fun and you would be filled up with fine food. The Jewish delis in Santa Monica, are some of the best! My favorite being, The Bagel Nosh...Ah...if you ever do make it down here, make sure you hit Little Tokyo in the downtown area of L.A. Then, hop over to Chinatown and you will not be disappointed since I am sure the food you dined on in Beijing was good. Did you try the rat meat? I am asking since I watched a food channel special about Chinese cooking and it was mentioned...not here, but there in Beijing. I have to say, it did look good and who is to say I would not have eaten it had I not known?
laugh.gif

The South Bay is filled with lots of Japanese places as are many areas here in my neck of the woods. Chinese food is great too! We hang out at a place close to home where the food is fresh, cheap, and served in generous amounts, steaming hot...the owners are most gracious too. Point Dume is its name...they must love Malibu...
Well, all the best to you as you vie for a place on the UCLA graduate list...not sure about the money since the current, newly elected Governor is a tightwad and will spend only on his pet projects.
laugh.gif

That plate looks interesting with lots of red chile peppers? Name of the dish and I will find out if it be available here...I am sure it is.
wink.gif
 

Ausdoerrt

-sama
Retired
That's Lazi Ji - a Sichuan staple, so I'm sure some place has it. Probably a bit rare, since it uses a lot of unique spices and is way too hot for American tastes. Another favorite, however, I am yet to see anywhere in the States: http://www.ghy.cn/images/imageData/life/20...¿½é”…豆腐.jpg (it's shaguo, hotpot's little brother; perfect for lunch in cold weather).

QUOTE Did you try the rat meat?

N-no. My rule is always "eat what the locals eat". Rat is definitely not on any common menu.
 

ImTakes

sama
Retired
QUOTE (Ausdoerrt @ Mar 07 2011, 12:34 AM) That's Lazi Ji - a Sichuan staple, so I'm sure some place has it. Probably a bit rare, since it uses a lot of unique spices and is way too hot for American tastes. Another favorite, however, I am yet to see anywhere in the States: http://www.ghy.cn/images/imageData/life/20...¿½é”…豆腐.jpg (it's shaguo, hotpot's little brother; perfect for lunch in cold weather).



N-no. My rule is always "eat what the locals eat". Rat is definitely not on any common menu.
I see...then I wonder why it was showcased on the food program? Hum...a detailed show, too. Anyway, perhaps, to scandalize us here in the states?
blink.gif

Sichuan? I will ask around and if I am told it is a staple to the Chinese community here in SoCal...well, I will pm you and let you know. Til then, good eating, Aus~san!
 

Ausdoerrt

-sama
Retired
QUOTE I see...then I wonder why it was showcased on the food program? Hum...a detailed show, too.

From what I've seen, some of those food-travel shows tend to be a bit touristy, and there is a plenty of weird stuff that Chinese try to attract tourists with.
laugh.gif
It exists, but that's not what the locals eat on a daily basis. I can assure you that no self-respecting Beijinger would treat a guest to rat meat. They would treat you to dumplings, shrimp in tomato sauce and all sorts of other staples.
 

ImTakes

sama
Retired
QUOTE (Ausdoerrt @ Mar 07 2011, 01:06 AM) From what I've seen, some of those food-travel shows tend to be a bit touristy, and there is a plenty of weird stuff that Chinese try to attract tourists with. 
laugh.gif
  It exists, but that's not what the locals eat on a daily basis. I can assure you that no self-respecting Beijinger would treat a guest to rat meat. They would treat you to dumplings, shrimp in tomato sauce and all sorts of other staples.
Well, from now on, those touristy shows will be treated with a grain of salt.
tongue.gif
I am glad to know rat meat is only eaten should one venture off the beaten path and who knows where that path be nowadays, eh, Aus-san?
rolleyes.gif
We watched how those critters were first boiled, then skinned and gutted, then de-boned. They were grilled up or in some sort of stir fry with all sorts of veggies and spices and whatnots...the customers sure looked like they were enjoying themselves while dining on such a delicacy. I shivered at the thought. Ah well...your dumplings and Shrimp with tomato sauce sound so much yummier. I will take mine spicy, if you please.
laugh.gif
 

warita200

Tai Youkai
Sempai
It is nice to see some action in this thread, I would however ask you two to stop spamming it with personal messages and take it to PMs.

If you wish to share some recipes however, I am all ears.
laugh.gif
 

Kaeru-P

~ Person who asks random questions randomly ~
Kouhai
QUOTE (ImTakes @ Mar 07 2011, 07:43 PM) Well, from now on, those touristy shows will be treated with a grain of salt.
tongue.gif
I am glad to know rat meat is only eaten should one venture off the beaten path and who knows where that path be nowadays, eh, Aus-san?
rolleyes.gif
We watched how those critters were first boiled, then skinned and gutted, then de-boned. They were grilled up or in some sort of stir fry with all sorts of veggies and spices and whatnots...the customers sure looked like they were enjoying themselves while dining on such a delicacy. I shivered at the thought. Ah well...your dumplings and Shrimp with tomato sauce sound so much yummier. I will take mine spicy, if you please.
laugh.gif

well being an asian I have to say we do have an extent of exotic foods. I'll honest that I do enjoy some of them though its best not I mention "what" I ate. Although Yes even you can see these "exotic foods" here now and then within asian countries, not all of the local people dare to enjoy it. Well as for me I am man that wants to experience every aspect of life, I seek that which is not the norm so yeah...well just my two cents on the matter
laugh.gif
 

ImTakes

sama
Retired
QUOTE (lavenderdays @ Mar 08 2011, 05:12 AM)well being an asian I have to say we do have an extent of exotic foods. I'll honest that I do enjoy some of them though its best not I mention "what" I ate. Although Yes even you can see these "exotic foods" here now and then within asian countries, not all of the local people dare to enjoy it. Well as for me I am man that wants to experience every aspect of life, I seek that which is not the norm so yeah...well just my two cents on the matter 
laugh.gif

@ lavenderdays...Your two cents are much appreciated and read with great interest since it is always interesting to know what others in the Far East, enjoy as far as the culinary delights go. In Mexico and parts of the Southwest, many types of good foods are enjoyed as well along with various types of chile peppers, fruits, and vegetables. There are also many types of cocoa beans used in some of the more special dishes. In the famed dish that is Mole (moleh, if pronounced correctly), we use at least, two types of chocolate and three types of chile to make it spicy yet sweet yet all the flavors combined, a subtle taste of both.
wink.gif
Once the Mole is ready, it is served with Pollo (chicken) and if one desires, rice and beans and tortillas.
Should you ever travel to Mexico, especially, the areas of Oaxaca and beyond, try their Mole, as it is rumored to be some of the best and most authentic in the world.
This is what it looks like when being prepared...
mole440.jpg
 

chiisai_hana

-nipah!
Retired
QUOTE (warita200 @ Mar 07 2011, 01:58 AM)Anybody out there that has tried making sushi as well?
My cousin & I made our own Japanese-inspired dinner a couple years ago. Of course, the tempura didn't use panko and the sushi rice didn't have any seasoning, but it was still tasty!



Her rolls were a little tighter than mine
laugh.gif
I still love making onigiri (I have a couple different-sized moulds now, as hand-shaping hot rice is not a good time), and miso soup is soooo easy to make at home. I recently made a really delicious Japanese beef stew (soy & mirin were the base, then you added beef, potatoes, carrots and onion)

My newest love is Korean-inspired beef. Yum
wub.gif
Also so easy to make at home. And once I go back to school, I'll be jumping on the bento box making again.


@ ImTakes - Thank you so much for the post about mole! I was reading a recipe for it recently, and had no idea what it actually was.

the truth revealed: I'm secretly a hardcore foodie. who reads decades-old cookbooks and makes her own pickles. and recently has an obsession with making pie, when she doesn't even like it.
 

ImTakes

sama
Retired
QUOTE (chiisai_hana @ Mar 29 2011, 06:51 PM) @ ImTakes - Thank you so much for the post about mole! I was reading a recipe for it recently, and had no idea what it actually was.


@ chiisai_hana! Long time no see...and you are most welcome with regards to the Mole post/article.
wink.gif
Your Japanese-inspired dinner looks way yummy.
Anyway, here are some Mole recipes made easy...give them a try.
http://www.mademan.com/mm/5-easy-mole-day-recipes.html
I make my Mole from scratch but if you can find the commercial made Mole, you are in luck...do tell, if you try them out.
 

chiisai_hana

-nipah!
Retired
Thanks, I'll bookmark the link for future reference! It sounds like an interesting combination of flavours
smile.gif


If anyone wants to try their hand at crumpet making, I recommend this recipe. Just made it this morning and they're amazing. Way better than the store-bought variety! I think they'll taste especially good once I crack open a jar of that peach jam I made last sumer, mmm.
 

warita200

Tai Youkai
Sempai
QUOTE (chiisai_hana @ Apr 15 2011, 06:08 PM) If anyone wants to try their hand at crumpet making, I recommend this recipe. Just made it this morning and they're amazing.
Oh chiisai Hana, you dont know what you are doing to a girl on diet (=me). I have never eaten it, but I can so picture this goodness in my head. Aaaahhhh, I think I will have to make this soon, I will report my findings later
tongue.gif


So now for what I have cooked: I made wonderful fried shrimps this weekend. The weather was so nice, the warm spring sun rays caressed my eyes in the morning and woke up feeling energised and decided to go to the farmer market in the center of Vienna and couldnt resist buying some fresh unfrozen tiger shrimps. A kidney transplant on the black market is cheaper than the shrimps, but I just couldnt say no this time.

At home I pondered how to prepare them and googled some recipes, until I decided to improvise something on my own, out of experience I know this brings the best results. The preparation I decided to go for was super easy, as usually.

Ingredients:
1. Tiger shrimps, skinned, veined and washed
2. lemon juice (1-2 tablespoon)
3. Olive oil (1-2 tablespoon)
4. salt, pepper, yellow thai curry (I still had some of the yellow thai curry paste left from last week. I must use it within a week or two, so I am trying to put it in as many dishes as possible and it sure went damn well with the shrimps)
5. minced garlic
6. brown sugar (weak tea spoon)

Preparation:
1. Mix all the ingredients except the shrimps together and whip it (the result looks almost a little like a light liquid mayonaise).
2. Por the marinade over the shrimps and let it rest for an hour
3. Heat some oil on the pan and add the shrimps, fry on both sides about 2 minutes
4. Pour the marinade on the shrimps and allow the marinade to caramelise over the shrimps.

If any of you guys like shrimps, you gotta try this. It is a great appetizer dish in my opinion and the whole preparation including cooking didnt take longer than 10 minutes.
 

franzoir

-the smooth, the suave, and the shrewd
Sempai
Yesterday GF asked me to cook her a meal. I decided to cook Jambalaya. I think its a manly dish, just throw everything in and hope for the best.

Ingredients:
Fresh Chicken stock (If you can make it)
3 cans of peeled plum tomatoes
Coarse black peppers
Rosemary
Parsley
Sage
2 Chicken fillets
Chorizo
Red Onions (or w/e)
Turmeric
4 vineyard tomatoes
Peppers (1 green, 1 red , 1 yellow)
2 crushed garlic
Long grain American rice (or w/e doesnt matter as long as its not short grained)


Preparation:
My preparation is different (easier/healthier) since I use a steam cooker as opposed to a frying pan with oil.

If you have steam cooker...

1. Pour the amount of rice you want into the cooker
2. Add turmeric and mix into the rice
3. Add the crushed garlic cloves and peeled plums tomato into a blender. Put a tbs of tomato puree into the mix and blend until smooth.
4. Chop the vegetables and meat (remove the undesirables like stalks, seeds, pulp etc) and add to the rice. Make sure you get all the juices in as well
5. Add the tomato sauce and the chicken stock to the rice& co.
6. Add water (make sure you add enough to cook the ingredients but also maintain the consistency of the sauce). This is the part your most likely to frack up.
7. Turn on cooker and your golden!

Fluff the rice (the rice should look a golden/brownish colour underneath) and mix into the sauce. Despite being easy to cook it always looks gorgeous and impressive since its so colourful. Since Im using the normal timer on the steam cooker (about 20mins) and cooking with steam alone everything like the chicken and chorizo should be cooked to perfection.

A few more recipes to my name and I will be able to call myself a modern man.
 

warita200

Tai Youkai
Sempai
Than sounds great fanzoir. I will try this out, but I will use a wok or something as I dont have a rice cooker.

Where is it that you live if I may ask?
 
Playasia - Play-Asia.com: Online Shopping for Digital Codes, Video Games, Toys, Music, Electronics & more
Top